This article sprouted out of a rather rash promise. I recently posted about massive scientific errors in a self-professed ‘data driven parenting guide’ (Cribsheet by Emily Oster). This was the very first comment:

Great, so if you were to write a science based, research backed rebuttal to this chapter alone, it would recommend what exactly? No daycare? Daycare in particular family instances at particular ages?

While I know the research here, I’ve always been reluctant to write about it: everything’s so politicised and parents (understandably) get very upset if they don’t think they’re doing the best by their children. So…


We’re often told that if we avoid waste and live in harmony with nature, we can stop climate change. But…

Plastic bags don’t cause global warming. Recycling often does. Cattle are responsible for about 10% of global emissions. And reusable nappies cause more warming than disposable ones.

In this article, I’ll go through the things someone in a developed country can do reduce climate change, and show you how effective each actually is, backed up with the science.

The Little Planet

If I tell you that going vegetarian will reduce your greenhouse gas emissions by 1.1 tons a year, is that a little…


I’ve written a post showing you how individual choices affect global warming. You really should read that first. This is a long supporting post telling you about the research, the (frequent) misunderstandings of it in the media and then the adaptations needed to get meaningful warming numbers.

Children

I’m nervous writing about this topic. Research suggests that when people feel climate change science is critical of their choices, they reach by attacking the science or attacking scientists’ own lifestyles.

Please don’t.

Please do not Galileo me.

I don’t feel I’m in a position to criticise anyone’s choices or lifestyle. For many people, how many children to…


I’ve written a post showing you how individual choices affect global warming. You should read that instead. This is a dry, technical supporting post showing you where the numbers come from. If you read it, please read it after my post on methods. For reasons given there, I’ll be relying a lot on a book by Mike Berners-Lee for emission intensities of actions, although every figure will be cross-checked against other sources.

Driving

Cars, Cars, Cars

Thinking about emissions from driving is conceptually harder than any of the other actions we look at. The reason is that people buy cars, and making a car…


Credit.

There are many, many articles telling you how fast emissions need to decrease to limit warming to 2° C in 2100. This one’s different. I’ll show you how emissions are likely to decrease in developed countries, using both expert projections and historical trends.

I’ll be looking at two countries:

  • The UK, because it has reduced emissions more than any other developed country. Looking at the UK tells us a lot about how emissions are reduced, and how other countries are likely to proceed in future.
  • The US, because it accounts for such a large proportion of world emissions.

Throughout this…


Image. They were going to call it SARS-COV-2, but they thought that might make us worry too much…

You can save more lives without any economic hit, just by changing the timing of restrictions and lockdowns.

THERE is a surprising connection between COVID and the economy — and it’s not what you think…

In the 1960s, economists thought they had found a trade-off between jobs and inflation. By letting inflation run higher, you could create more jobs; if you pushed inflation down, there would be fewer jobs.

‘Aha!’ they said, ‘inflation is bad, but unemployment is much worse. Let’s turn up inflation and create more jobs.’

What happened? Well…

The 1970s was a pretty dismal period, and not…


I’ve written a post showing you how individual choices affect global warming. You should read that instead. This is a dry, technical supporting post showing you where the numbers come from. If you read it, please read it after my post on methods. For reasons given there, I’ll be relying a lot on a book by Mike Berners-Lee for emission intensities of actions, although every figure will be cross-checked against other sources.

Recycling

Transporting, sorting and processing recycled things all emit greenhouse gases; those have to be balanced against the emissions from creating new things. …


I’ve written a post showing you how individual choices affect global warming. You should read that instead. This is a dry, technical supporting post showing you where the numbers come from. If you read it, please read it after my post on methods. For reasons given there, I’ll be relying a lot on a book by Mike Berners-Lee for emission intensities of actions, although every figure will be cross-checked against other sources.

Air travel

Emissions per passenger-km

Berners-Lee estimates 3.5 tons of emissions for a return flight in economy class from London to Hong Kong (19,300km). …


I’ve written a post showing you how individual choices affect global warming. You should read that instead. This is a dry, technical supporting post showing you where the numbers come from. If you read it, please read it after my post on methods. For reasons given there, I’ll be relying a lot on a book by Mike Berners-Lee for emission intensities of actions, although every figure will be cross-checked against other sources.

The emissions figures for food seem to be less consistent than for the other sections I have analysed. That may be because of the time horizon or GWP/GTP…


I’ve written a post showing you how individual choices affect global warming. You should read that instead. This long, dry technical post explains my methods, and in particular how I go from annual emissions to warming estimates. It’s has lots of numbers in, so it’s really only for people who want to check my figures.

One key point up front. There will be nothing in here about who is to blame for climate change, or what you should or shouldn’t do about it.

Those aren’t scientific questions.

All that science can do is tell us the likely consequences of our…

criticalscience

Key science, with sources. Minus bad statistics. Minus shaky methodology. Minus politicisation, left or right.

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